Hardwood Flooring: Repair or Replace?

 

Hardwood floors add value and charm to your home. This excellent flooring option allows you to customize your home’s look and feel with many different choices.

With hardwood floors, it helps to know how to handle damaged wood. Knowing what type of damage is fixable can help you make prompt, smart decisions about your home’s flooring.

Hardwood can last for a century, but eventually, a replacement will be necessary. Should you go for a replacement or a repair?

 

Replace: You’ve Refinished Already

 

If you’ve refinished your hardwood floor a few times, you may not be able to repair it again. Most hardwood floors can be refinished three to five times, but this will depend on your flooring quality and material.

If nail heads are visible or the floor is too thin, you won’t be able to sand and refinish your floor again without ruining it. When you’ve refinished your floor too many times, it’s time to consider a hardwood floor replacement.

 

 

Repair: Can Match the Exact Species and Finish

 

When the damage to your hardwood floors is confined to a certain area and you’re able to match your species of wood and the finish, you may not have to replace your floors. A flooring professional can help you discover whether or not repairing your floor to match is a possibility.

If your floor is dated or is a unique material or finish, it might be impossible to match it for a repair. If this is the case, it might be time to go with a full replacement to maintain a cohesive look for your floors.

 

Replace: Flooding

 

Hardwood Floor ReplacementUnfortunately, water damage isn’t usually repairable. Significant water damage—especially for an extended period of time—can cause the wood to warp or gaps to form between the planks. This type of damage is best replaced.

If your water or moisture damage has been contained, it might be possible to replace individual boards rather than the entire floor. However, water damage is usually more widespread than what you can see, so keep in mind that a replacement might be your only option when water is involved.

 

Repair: Paint or Carpet Damage

 

Floors with paint stains or carpet material adhered to the wood can usually be repaired rather than replaced. These types of stains and damage are usually superficial and won’t warrant an entire floor replacement.

Of course, this is contingent on the extent of the damage as well as the condition of your wood. If your hardwood floor is thick enough and the damage isn’t extensive, you should be able to refinish the floor and skip a replacement this time!

 

Either: Mold and Termite Damage

 

signs to replace hardwood floorMold and termite damage on your hardwood floors might be possible to repair. If the damage covers the entire floor, a replacement will be necessary.

If your floors have mold, in some cases the subfloor will need to be repaired, which means a total floor replacement. If termites are the cause of your hardwood floor’s damage, your repair may be possible if the damaged is limited.

Both mold and termites have the potential to damage your floors far beyond what you can see, so having a professional look at the damage can help you make the best decision.

 

What’s Your Best Option?

 

Knowing whether or not you can repair your hardwood floors will all depend on what’s damaged them. Hardwood floors do have a lifespan and will eventually warrant a replacement due to age. However, you may be able to repair if your damage is fixable. Contact your local flooring professionals to find out how to fix your floors!

 

 

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Hardwood Flooring: Repair or Replace?
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Hardwood Flooring: Repair or Replace?
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Hardwood floors add value and charm to your home. This excellent flooring option allows you to customize your home’s look and feel with many different choices. With hardwood floors, it helps to know how to handle damaged wood.
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Total Flooring
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